Monthly Archives: November 2014

Organised Mayhem

Lough Leane, County Kerry, Ireland.   When I saw the sky I thought there could be potential for them to provide strong impact. As the sun was rising from one side and a storm front was moving in from the other side, this landscape continued to deliver its pulsing impact in the midst of the unfolding drama. The rising sun illuminated the mountain with an ethereal glow. All I had to do was to concentrate and photograph the landscape.   Organised Mayhem...

If Your Photos Aren’t Good Enough is Because Your Camera Isn’t Expensive Enough

Timeless Mist   The best camera in landscape photography is the most expensive one.   If I gave myself advice in landscape photography if I started all over again I would tell myself, “Shah, buy yourself the most expensive camera out there for landscape photography. You are a newbie and not very good at it. You don’t know any technical settings. You aren’t inspired. Buying a really expensive camera will make you great.”   I think all landscape photographers should buy the most expensive camera out there in the market. The camera you currently own isn’t good enough. It doesn’t have enough megapixels, it doesn’t have good enough high-ISO performance.   Whenever you are lacking inspiration, buying a new camera will alleviate that. You will go deep into credit...

Demonstrations Against Water Charges

_DSC0259 copy Today was the demonstration in Killarney against unfair water charges. Serious speeches were made, people had fun AND most important it was peaceful. The Irish government is forcing these charges or to be more precise taxes on the public at a time when the public is bombarded with one tax increase after another. There is now the property tax which is astronomical. Public spending has been cut to the bone therefore public services will suffer particularly the health service.   (more…)...

Successful Steps to Seascape Photography

Secret Dusk1) Time it right. Dawn and dusk are the best times to shoot. For dawn shots get to the location at least 45 minutes before sunrise. At dusk, keep shooting after the sun has set - until all traces of colour has faded away. 2) Watch the weather. You need moody conditions to shoot seascapes. Check xcweather.co.uk and metcheck.com to check the forecast. 3) Blur the sea. For waves crashing against the shore, use between 0.5 and 2 seconds. At dawn or dusk, use exposures of 20-30 seconds so the sea records as a gentle mist. Use a 10-stop filter and open the shutter for several minutes. 4) Convert to B&W. Seascapes shot in stormy weather often look dramatic in monochrome. 5) Return...